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Diahann Carroll

Saturday Only!
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an American television and stage actress and singer known for her performances in some of the earliest major studio films to feature black casts, including Carmen Jones (1954) and Porgy and Bess (1959) as well as on Broadway.

Julia (1968) was one of the first series on American television to star a black woman in a nonstereotypical role and was followed by her portrayal of Dominique Deveraux in the primetime soap opera Dynasty over three seasons. She is the recipient of numerous stage and screen nominations and awards, including the Golden Globe Award for "Best Actress In A Television Series" in 1968.

At the age of 18, Carroll got her big break when she appeared as a contestant on the Dumont Television Network program, Chance of a Lifetime, hosted by Dennis James. On the show which aired January 8, 1954, Carroll took the $1,000 top prize for her rendition of the Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein song, "Why Was I Born?" She went on to win the following four weeks. Engagements at Manhattan's Cafe Society and Latin Quarter nightclubs soon followed.

Carroll's film debut was a supporting role in Carmen Jones (1954) as a rival to the sultry lead character played by Dorothy Dandridge. That same year, she starred in the Broadway musical, House of Flowers. In 1959, she played Clara in the film version of George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess, but her character's singing parts were dubbed by opera singer Loulie Jean Norman.

She made a guest appearance in the series Peter Gunn, in the 1960 episode "Sing a Song of Murder". She starred with Sidney Poitier, Paul Newman, and Joanne Woodward in the 1961 film Paris Blues.

In 1962, Diahann won the Tony Award for best actress (a first for a black woman) for the role of Barbara Woodruff in the Samuel A. Taylor and Richard Rodgers musical No Strings.

In 1974, she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for the film Claudine.

Carroll is well known for her title role in the 1968 television series Julia, which made her the first African American actress to star in her own television series where she did not play a domestic worker. That role won her the Golden Globe Award for "Best Actress In A Television Series" in 1968, and a nomination for an Emmy Award in 1969.

Some of her earlier work also included appearances on shows hosted by Jack Paar, Merv Griffin, Johnny Carson, Judy Garland, and Ed Sullivan, and on The Hollywood Palace variety show.

In 1984, Carroll joined the nighttime soap opera Dynasty as the jetsetter Dominique Deveraux, half-sister of Blake Carrington. Her high-profile role on Dynasty also reunited her with schoolmate Billy Dee Williams, who briefly played her onscreen husband Brady Lloyd. Carroll remained on the show until 1987, simultaneously making several appearances on its short-lived spin-off, The Colbys. She received her third Emmy nomination in 1989 for the recurring role of Marion Gilbert in A Different World.

In 1991, Carrol played the role of Eleanor Potter, the wife of Jimmy Potter, portrayed by Chuck Patterson, in The Five Heartbeats, a musical drama film in which Jimmy manages a vocal group. In this role, Carroll was a doting, concerned, and protective wife alongside actor and musician Robert Townsend, Leon Michael Wright, and others. In a 1995 reunion with Billy Dee Williams in Lonesome Dove: The Series, she played Mrs. Greyson, the wife of Williams' character.

In 1996, Carroll starred as the self-loving and deluded silent movie star Norma Desmond in the Canadian production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical version of the classic film Sunset Boulevard. In 2001, Carroll made her animation debut in The Legend of Tarzan, in which she voiced Queen La, an evil sorceress and ruler of the ancient city of Opar.

In 2006, she appeared in the television medical drama Grey's Anatomy as Jane Burke, the demanding mother of Dr. Preston Burke. In December 2008, Carroll was cast in USA Network's series White Collar as June, the savvy widow who rents out her guest room to Neal Caffrey.
Taurean Blacque
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an American television and stage actor, best known for his role as Detective Neal Washington on the series Hill Street Blues.

He also appeared in Lou Grant, CHiPs, The Golden Girls, L.A. Law, General Hospital, The Larry Sanders Show, NYPD Blue(S04E16), Six Feet Under, Sons of Anarchy, 24, and Once Upon a Time

Blacque was born in Newark, New Jersey. Before appearing on television, Blacque trained and performed at the New Federal Theatre in New York, a theater founded to provide opportunities to minorities and women Early in his acting career, Blacque began making guest appearances in sitcoms such as What's Happening!!, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, The Tony Randall Show, Good Times, and Taxi, and auditioned for permanent roles on others, including Venus Flytrap on WKRP in Cincinnati, eventually played by Tim Reid.

In 1981 he joined the cast of the police drama Hill Street Blues, staying with the show throughout its run, which ended in 1987. While appearing on that show, he was nominated in 1982 for the Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series, but lost to fellow HSB actor Michael Conrad, in the only year in which all the nominees in a category came from the same series His theatrical career continued during his run on the show, winning him an NAACP Image Award of Best Actor (Local) in 1985 for his role in Amen Corner In 1986 his stage roles included the male lead in the musical Don't Get God Started during its initial six-week summer run in Beverly Hills.

After Hill Street ended, Blacque moved to Atlanta, Georgia, to provide a better home for his children; in his new home, he has focused on theatrical work while making occasional guest appearances on television. Notable stage performances include Stepping Into Tomorrow with Yolanda King in 1987 and a 1988 revival of Ceremonies in Dark Old Men. Television work included a pilot, Off-Duty, for CBS, in which Blacque once again played a police officer; the show was not picked up by the network Blacque also had a small role in Disney's animated film Oliver & Company In 1989, he portrayed Henry Marshall on NBC's Generations. Film work in this period included a lead role in the 1989 science-fiction film DeepStar Six.
Deborah Richter
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Deborah Richter is an actress and writer, known for "Cyborg" (1989), "Promised Land" (1987) and "Square Dance" (1987).

She was previously married to Charles Haid. who was best known as Police Officer 'Andy Renko, on the hit 80s series, Hill Street Blues (1981). Deborah also appeared in the show occasionally as Renko's wife 'Daryl Ann' and they later married in real-life. Popular Dutch indie band Daryll-Ann got their name from Deborah Richter's character on Hill Street Blues." The bands first album was named "Renko", after another Hill Street Blues character, played by Charles Haid, who was her husband in the series (and later on in real life).

Deborah still works in entertainment and looks forward to her Hollywood Show signing convention debut with her "Hill Street Blues" co-stars in October.
Barbara Bosson

1st Ever Appearance!
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an American actress who has starred on television and in film.

Her first feature film was the crime thriller Bullitt (1968). She is well known for her roles in the 1980s NBC television series Hill Street Blues as the vulnerable Fay Furillo during the series' first six seasons. She later went on to play the tough prosecutor Miriam Grasso on Murder One from 1995 to 1997, which earned her an Emmy Award nomination.

Bosson starred in the 1970s series Richie Brockelman, Private Eye as Sharon. Other roles include the series Hooperman and Cop Rock. Some of Bosson's film appearances include her well-known role as Alex Rogan's mother in the science fiction film The Last Starfighter (1984).

Bosson has made guest appearances on many series, ranging from Mannix, Crazy Like a Fox, L.A. Law, Civil Wars, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (in episode "Rivals" as Roana) and Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.
Betty Thomas
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an American actress and a director of television and motion pictures. She is known for her Emmy-award winning role as Lucy Bates on the television series Hill Street Blues.

Thomas came to her entertainment career by a circuitous route. While working as an artist and school teacher she became a waitress at The Second City to earn extra cash for a trip abroad. While waiting tables Thomas was encouraged to try out for the troupe, and subsequently joined the company She was praised for her brassy and outspoken performances; she also worked with several up and coming Second City alumni, most notably Bill Murray When The Second City opened a Los Angeles branch, Thomas moved west.

Upon her arrival in Los Angeles Thomas received many bit parts in low-budget films like Chesty Anderson, USN (1976), the Robert Zemeckis film Used Cars (1980) as well as sketch comedy films like Tunnel Vision (1975), and Loose Shoes (1980) the latter of which featuring Second City classmate Bill Murray. She appeared in the 1989 film Troop Beverly Hills, starring Shelley Long.

While Thomas had been building her career in comedy, her breakthrough role as an actress came when she was cast in the dramatic role of police officer (later Sergeant) Lucille Bates on the TV series Hill Street Blues (1981-87). Over the course of the series her character goes from inexperienced rookie to confident sergeant. She received seven.

Directing career

After making several other acting appearances Thomas was given the chance to direct episodes of Hooperman and the premiere episodes of Doogie Howser, M.D. in 1989. She went on to direct episodes of Arresting Behavior and several episodes of the HBO series Dream On, the latter of which earned her an Emmy for best director.

In 1992 Thomas took the next step in her directing career with her feature debut Only You. A slight, playful romantic comedy; Only You was a departure from Thomas's experience on Hill Street Blues or her subsequent television directing. Some said that Thomas was chosen to direct due in part to the film's plot in which a man is on a hapless quest to find the perfect woman would be considered inherently sexist without a female director.

Three years following the release of Only You Thomas directed The Brady Bunch Movie (1995). A satirical vision of the 1970s television series The Brady Bunch. The Brady Bunch Movie was a box office hit with $46,576,136, nearly quadrupling its $12,000,000 budget. The Brady Bunch Movie remains one of the highest-grossing films directed by a woman.

She followed The Brady Bunch Movie with other successes, including Private Parts (1997), Dr. Dolittle (1998), 28 Days(2000), and John Tucker Must Die (2006). 2009's Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel became the first female-directed picture to gross more than $200 million and made her the most successful woman director to that time at the box office. In 2012, Thomas directed a low-budget online series called Audrey for the WIGS YouTube channel.
Charles Haid
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an American actor and director, with notable work in both movies and television. He is best known for his portrayal of Officer Andy Renko in Hill Street Blues.

Haid was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Grace Marian (ne Folger) and Charles Maurice Haid, Jr. He attended Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), where he met Steven Bochco. He was associate producer of the original stage production of Godspell in 1971, which was developed at CMU.

Haid's acting credits include the 1976/1977 police drama series Delvecchio as Sgt. Paul Schonski, the 1980s police drama series Hill Street Blues as Officer Andy Renko, and the 1980 movie Altered States as Dr. Mason Parrish. In 1984, Haid was cast as "The Fatman" (or just "Fats" in the never released movie The House of God. In 20042005, Haid played C. T. Finney, a corrupt New York police captain, on the sixth season of the NBC show Third Watch. Haid provided the voice of the one-legged rabbit "Lucky Jack" in the 2004 Disney animated film Home on the Range. Twenty years earlier, Haid had voiced main character "Montgomery Moose" in the pilot episode of The Get Along Gang, produced by Nelvana. He was replaced by Sparky Marcus for the subsequent series.

His directing credits include an episode of ER that earned him a Directors Guild Award, and DGA nominations for the TV movie Buffalo Soldiers and an episode of NYPD Blue. He was a regular director on the FX series Nip/Tuck. He has also directed for the FX series Sons of Anarchy and AMC's Breaking Bad. He is a regular director for the CBS series Criminal Minds, for which he also portrayed serial killer Randall Garner (a.k.a. "The Fisher King").

Chester Rushing
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Chester Rushing is an actor and musician best known for his role of Tommy H. on Netflix critically acclaimed series, Stranger Things.

His work spans such films as, Cold Moon, My Father Die, "The Duel, Don't Look in the Basement 2, and Believe Me. Chester has also appeared on the hit show NCIS: New Orleans and South of Hell. When Chester is not filming he tours with his band Chester Rushing performing hits from his album, "Halfway Across the Stars", produced by Ryan Greene. His original music has been remixed by several DJs across the globe including the hit single, "Paint the World", which reached #2 on the Italian EDM charts
Clark Brandon
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an American actor. His most notable roles were as Max Merlin's apprentice Zachary Rogers in the CBS series Mr. Merlin and as Sean Fitzpatrick, the older brother, in the CBS series The Fitzpatricks.

He also starred with Jim Varney in the 1989 comedy film, Fast Food. Brandon also directed three films: Dark Secrets (1992), Skeeter (1993) and The Last Road (1997)

David Harris
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an American television and film actor, most notable for his portrayal of Cochise, a young gang member, in the 1979 film The Warriors.

He has appeared as a supporting actor in a number of films and television series, and commonly plays police officers and military personnel.

His first role came in the 1976 television film Judge Horton and the Scottsboro Boys, in which he co-starred as Haywood Patterson. He followed this up with a number of supporting roles until 1979, when he appeared as Cochise in The Warriors, the role for which he is best remembered. He also appeared in the Robert Redford film Brubaker the following year. Throughout the 1980s, he appeared in a number of fairly high-profile films, and in the 1990s, he did mostly television work. His last film and television roles were both in 2001, but he lent his voice to The Warriors video game in 2005, reprising his role as Cochise. In 2012, he played in Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.

Deborah Van Valkenburgh
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Deborah Van Valkenburgh is a Los Angeles-based Actress, Singer, Artist and Writer working in all manner of media including TV, Film and Theatre across the globe.

Deborah graduated from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, N.Y. with a BFA in Painting & Drawing. However, performing has always been an integral facet of her creative repertoire. As a teen in Upstate New York she performed in coffee houses with the folk band Spur Of The Moment and during college she sang locally in a duo popularly known as The Myrtle Avenue Watermelon.

She made her professional debut on Broadway in the revival of HAIR. This was swiftly followed by Deborah's memorable performance as "Mercy" in Walter Hill's cult classic The Warriors then 5 years as "Jackie Rush" on the hit TV sitcom Too Close For Comfort. Extensive Film and Television credits also include Rob Zombie's The Devil's Rejects, The Trials Of Cate McCall (opposite Kate Beckinsale), the award winning short film Broken Hart, Albert Pyun’s Road To Hell (for which Deborah won the 2012 PollyGrind Festival Award for Best Supporting Actress), Walter Hill's Streets Of Fire, William Friedkin's Rampage, Criminal (with John C. Reilly & Diego Luna), Free Enterprise (opposite William Shatner), Mean Guns, Brainsmasher: A Love Story, A Bunny's Tale (starring Kirstie Alley), the Sci Fi Channel miniseries Firestarter 2: Rekindled (with Malcolm McDowell), horror anthology series Monsters, and a m'lange of guest-starring roles on such shows as Touch (with Kiefer Sutherland), Castle, The Event, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Ghost Whisperer, Criminal Minds, The Unit, Without A Trace, Cold Case, The Shield, ER, Mystery Woman, and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Throughout her career, Deborah has appeared on a wide array of stages across the country performing in such notable venues as TOSOS, Geva Theatre Center, Manhattan Theatre Club, San Diego REP, The Old Globe Theatre, South Coast REP, The Blank Theatre Company, The Matrix, The Odyssey Theatre Ensemble, LATC, Arizona Theatre Company and Portland Center Stage. Acclaimed Productions include Amy and David Sedaris, The Book Of Liz, Steve Martin's Picasso At The Lapin Agile, the World Premiere of Ruby's Bucket Blood, The Beauty Queen Of Leenane, Dancing At Lughnasa, Burn This, The Goat, Company, Tamara, The Heidi Chronicles, Pump Boys & Dinettes, and Livin' Dolls by Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman. Deborah continued her musical escapades in the early 90's as a featured vocalist for Peter Tork: A Likely Story and acoustic band DB HOUSE at a variety of legendary clubs like The Roxy, At My Place and Coconut Teaszer.
Ed Asner
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is an American film, television, stage, and voice actor and former president of the Screen Actors Guild, primarily known for his Emmy Award-winning role as Lou Grant on both The Mary Tyler Moore Show and its spin-off series, Lou Grant. In 2009, he starred as the voice of Carl Fredricksen in Pixar's award-winning animated film, Up. In early 2011, Asner returned to television as butcher Hank Greziak in "Working Class", the first original sitcom on cable channel CMT.

Following his military service, Asner joined the Playwrights Theatre Company in Chicago, but left for New York before members of that company regrouped as the Compass Players in the mid-1950s. He later made guest appearances with the successor to Compass, The Second City, and is considered part of The Second City extended family. In New York, Asner played Jonathan Jeremiah Peachum in the acclaimed Broadway revival of Threepenny Opera, and began to make inroads as a television actor. Asner playing his most famous role, as Lou Grant in Mary Tyler Moore.

Before he landed his role with Mary Tyler Moore, Asner guest-starred in such television series as NBC's The Outlaws (1962), in the series finale of CBS's The Reporter, Mission: Impossible and The Invaders.

Asner is best known for his character Lou Grant, who was first introduced on The Mary Tyler Moore Show in 1970. In 1977, after the end of the Mary Tyler Moore show, Asner's character was given his own show, Lou Grant, which ran from 1977-1982. In contrast to the Mary Tyler Moore show, which was a thirty minute comedy, the Lou Grant show was an hour long award-winning drama about journalism. (For his role as Grant, Asner is the only actor to win the Emmy award for a sitcom and a drama for the same role.) Other TV series starring Asner in regular roles include Thunder Alley, The Bronx Zoo, and Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip.

Asner was acclaimed for his role in the miniseries Roots, as Captain Davies, the man who kidnapped Kunta Kinte and sold him into slavery, a role that earned Asner an Emmy Award, and for a similarly dark role as Axel Jordache in the mini-series Rich Man, Poor Man. In contrast, he played Pope John XXIII in Papa Giovanni: Ioannes XXIII, an Italian miniseries for RAI.

Asner has also had an extensive voice acting career. He provided the voices for J. Jonah Jameson on the 1990s animated television series Spider-Man, Hudson on Gargoyles, Jabba the Hutt on the radio version of Star Wars, Master Vrook from Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic and its sequel, Roland Daggett on Batman: The Animated Series, Cosgrove on Freakazoid!, Ed Wuncler on The Boondocks, and Granny Goodness in various DC Comics animated series. Asner has also provided voice-over narration for many documentaries and films of social activism.

More recently, Asner provided the voice of Carl Fredricksen in the 2009 Pixar film Up. He received great critical praise for the role, with one critic going so far as to suggest "They should create a new category for this year's Academy Award for Best Vocal Acting in an Animated Film and name Asner as the first recipient.

He has appeared in a recurring segment, on Jay Leno's The Tonight Show, entitled "Does This Impress Ed Asner?"

He was recently cast in a Country Music Television comedy pilot, Regular Joe.

In 2001, Asner was the recipient of the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award.

Asner has won more Emmy Awards for performing than any other male actor (eight, including five for the role of Lou Grant). In 2003, he was inducted into the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame.

In July 2010, Asner completed recording sessions for Shattered Hopes: The True Story of the Amityville Murders which is a forthcoming documentary on the 1974 DeFeo murders in Amityville, New York. Asner serves as the narrator for the film, which covers a forensic analysis of the murders, the trial in which 23-year old DeFeo son Ronald DeFeo Jr., was convicted of the killings, and the subsequent "haunting" story which is revealed to be a hoax. In January 2011, Asner took a supporting role on CMT's first original sitcom "Working Class".

A prominent member of the Democratic Socialists of America, Asner served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild, .
Ed Marinaro
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a former American Footballplayer and actor. In 1971, he finished as a runner up to Pat Sullivanfor the Heisman Trophy, and from 2010–2011 starred in the football comedy series, Blue Mountain State.

He is best known as a regular cast member on "Hill Street Blues", playing Officer Joe Coffey for five seasons, 1981-1986.

Marinaro played college football at Cornell University where he set over 16 NCAA records. He was the first running back in NCAA history to run for 4,000 career rushing yards and led the nation in rushing in both 1970 and 1971.

Marinaro was runner-up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy in 1971, the highest finish for an Ivy League player since the league de-emphasized football in the mid-1950s. Princeton's Dick Kazmaier won the award in 1951 when the Ivy was still considered a major football conference. Marinaro won the 1971 Maxwell Award and the UPI College Football Player of the Year as the top player in college football. He holds two NCAA records: most rushes per game in a season (39.6 in 1971) and career average carries per game (34.0, 1969–71).

He went on to play professional football for six seasons with the Minnesota Vikings, New York Jets and Seattle Seahawks, appearing in Super Bowl VIII and Super Bowl IX with the Vikings. He scored 13 touchdowns over his career.

Marinaro was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1991After leaving football, Marinaro became an actor. He has been a cast member on a number of television series, including Laverne & Shirley and Sisters. He joined the regular cast of Hill Street Blues in 1981 playing officer Joe Coffey until 1986. He also appeared in the 2006 film Circus Island.

Marinaro played the head football coach for three seasons on Spike TV's comedy, Blue Mountain State.
George Wyner

1st Ever Appearance!
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an American film and television actor. Wyner graduated from Syracuse University in 1968 as a drama major, and was an in-demand character actor by the early 1970s.

To date, Wyner has made guest appearances in over 100 television series and co-starred in nine. He is probably best known for his role as ADA Bernstein on the series Hill Street Blues. He is also noted for memorable roles in films such as Spaceballs, American Pie 2 and Fletch.

Wyner was introduced to producer Steven Bochco while appearing in Bochco's short-lived 1976 series, Delvecchio. This led to the role as Irwin Bernstein in Hill Street, and to roles in 4 subsequent Bochco productions: Doogie Howser, M.D., Brooklyn South, NYPD Blue and L.A. Law. Additionally, Wyner has appeared on the following programs for Hill Street's production company, MTM: Rhoda, The Bob Newhart Show, The White Shadow, WKRP in Cincinnati and Newhart.
James Remar
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an American actor and voice actor. He played Richard, the on-off tycoon boyfriend of Kim Cattrall's character in Sex and the City, Ajax in The Warriors (1979).

He also played as homicidal maniac Albert Ganz in the thriller 48 Hrs. (1982), gangster Dutch Schultz in The Cotton Club (1984), Lord Raiden in Mortal Kombat: Annihilation (1997), Giuseppe Salvatore in The CW TV series The Vampire Diaries, Jack Duff in Miracle on 34th Street (1994), and Harry Morgan in the Showtime TV series Dexter.

Remar has spent the majority of his film career playing villains. He portrayed the violent and sexually aggressive character Ajax in the cult film The Warriors (1979), and the murdering sociopath Albert Ganz in the hit 48 Hrs. (1982). (Both films were directed by Walter Hill and co-starred David Patrick Kelly, whose character is named Luther in both). Remar also played real-life 1930s-era gangster Dutch Schultz in The Cotton Club (1984).

In contrast to these roles, Remar starred in the film Windwalker (1980) as the young Cheyenne Windwalker, for which he spoke his lines in the Cheyenne language. He also portrayed a gay man in the film Cruising (1980). In the same year, Remar had a cameo in the Western The Long Riders (1980); his character faced David Carradine's character in a bar fight over a woman Remar's character was married to.

He was the star of the 1986 film Quiet Cool (1986) and was cast as Corporal Hicks in the science-fiction/horror film Aliens (1986), but was replaced by Michael Biehn shortly after filming began, due to Remar's having a drug problem. For several years, the reason behind his dismissal was reported as "creative differences" with director James Cameron. At least one piece of footage featuring Remar made it into the final version of the film: when the Marines enter the processing station, and the camera tilts down from the Alien nest, though Remar is not seen in close-up. He is also filmed from the back as the Marines first enter the compound on LV-426 and when "Hicks" approaches the cocooned woman, again filmed from the rear so the viewer is unable to tell it is Remar and not Michael Biehn.

He played Quill, one of the main villains in The Phantom (1996). He appeared in Mortal Kombat: Annihilation (1997), the sequel to the film Mortal Kombat (1995), taking over the role of Raiden from Christopher Lambert. He then followed this with a role in the direct-to-video science fiction movie Robo Warriors (1996). Other films include Psycho (1998), in which he played the patrolman, Drugstore Cowboy (1989), Tales from the Darkside: The Movie (1990), Wedlock (1991), Boys on the Side (1995), The Quest (1996), Rites of Passage (1999), Hellraiser: Inferno (2000), 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003), Fear X (2003), Blade: Trinity (2004), The Girl Next Door (2004). He played a brief role as General Bratt in the prologue of Pineapple Express (2008). He also had a role in the horror movie The Unborn (2009), alongside C.S. Lee, who portrays Vince Masuka in Dexter).

Remar was featured in the film X-Men: First Class (2011) and voiced the Autobot Sideswipe in the film Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011), replacing Andr Sogliuzzo. He was also cast in the heist film Setup (2011) and starred in the film Arena (2011).

Remar played two different, unrelated characters in Quentin Tarantino's film Django Unchained (2012) his first character, Ace Speck, is killed near the beginning of the film by lead character, King Schultz (played by Christoph Waltz); Remar's second character, Butch Pooch, kills King Schultz near the end of the film. He starred, alongside Emma Roberts, Lucy Boynton, and Lauren Holly, in the thriller film The Blackcoat's Daughter (2015

Television

Remar's television appearances include the series Miami Vice, Hill Street Blues, Sex and the City (as the on-again, off-again boyfriend of Kim Cattrall's character), Tales from the Crypt, Jericho, Third Watch, Justice League Unlimited, and Battlestar Galactica. He also appeared as a possessed mental patient in the X-Files ninth-season episode "Daemonicus". He starred as Tiny Bellows on the short-lived television series, The Huntress (20002001). He appeared in the miniseries The Grid (2004) as Hudson "Hud", the love interest of Julianna Margulies' character. He had a recurring guest role in the 2006 television series Jericho on CBS. Remar guest-starred in the CBS crime drama Numb3rs, playing a weapons dealer who later turns good and helps the FBI.

From 2006 to 2013, Remar co-starred in Dexter on Showtime. Remar was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Dexter Morgan's adoptive father, Harry Morgan.

In 2010, he played guest roles as Giuseppe Salvatore in The CW series The Vampire Diaries and as James Ermine, a general for Jericho, a black-ops military contractor, on FlashForward

James Sikking
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an American actor known for his Emmy-nominated role as Lt. Howard Hunter on the 1980s NBC TV series Hill Street Blues.

He also starred on the ABC TV series Doogie Howser, M.D. as Dr. David Howser and on the short-lived 1997 CBS drama series Brooklyn South as Captain Stan Jonas. All three series were co-created by Steven Bochco. Sikking did the voice of General Gordon on the short-lived 1998 cartoon series Invasion America.

His film work includes The Competition, Outland, Up the Creek and Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, as well as a minor (but crucial) part, as a cynical hitman, in the earlier Point Blank. Sikking's film career started in 1955. Sikking starred in the 1992 Fox Network TV movie Doing Time on Maple Drive. He has made guest appearances on many TV series including Perry Mason, Rawhide, Bonanza, The Outer Limits, General Hospital, The Rockford Files, The Bob Newhart Show, Hogan's Heroes, Rich Man, Poor Man Book II, Hunter and Batman Beyond.

Sikking was born in Los Angeles. His mother, Sue Sikking (née Paxton), was a founder of Santa Monica's Unity-by-the-Sea Church. Sikking graduated from UCLA in 1959 and attended the University of Hawaii. He has two brothers, Tom and Art, and a sister, Joy. He is married to Florine Sikking, a cookbook author. They live in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles.
Jerry Mathers

Saturday Only!

Back by Popular Demand!
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This is an example of the endearing words said by Jerry "The Beaver" Mathers, who has become an American icon.

Born on June 2, 1948 in Sioux City Iowa, Jerry's television and show business career began at the tender age of two when he did a Pet Condensed Milk commercial with Ed Wynn on the "Colgate Comedy Hour." He continued to work on many of the early '50's live television shows and in 1954, he made his movie debut co-starring with Linda Darnell in "This Is My Love." He then caught the attention of Alfred Hitchcock who signed him for the 1955 film, "The Trouble with Harry," starring John Forsythe and Shirley MacLaine in what was her very first film role. The budding young actor next appeared in two Bob Hope movies, "The Seven Little Foys" and "That Certain Feeling." Two movies with Alan Ladd followed, "The Deep Six" and "Men of the Fighting Lady."

It was in 1957 however; with the debut of the series "Leave It To Beaver" that Jerry entered the hearts and homes of America. An immediate success, the show gained national attention and ran for six seasons, totaling 234 episodes. When it celebrated its 50th anniversary on October 4, 2007, the show became the longest running scripted show in television history. This year in 2017, the show is celebrating its 60th anniversary! Currently shown on Me-TV and in countries throughout the world, "Leave it to Beaver" has made Jerry an American Icon.

His television movie, "Still the Beaver", was one of the top ten movies of the week for 1982 which led to the development of a new series entitled "The New Leave It To Beaver." Jerry successfully completed filming 108 episodes which were syndicated and aired in all major domestic and foreign markets. As well as starring in the series, Jerry also directed multiple episodes. Mathers has a high "Q" rating for name and face recognition and is known by people throughout the world.
Joe Spano

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an American actor who came to prominence through his role as Lt. Henry Goldblume on Hill Street Blues. Spano is now best known for his work on NCIS as FBI Special Agent Tobias C. Fornell.

He moved to Hollywood in the late 1970s, landing guest shots on TV and bit roles in American Graffiti (1973) and The Enforcer (1976).

In Hill Street Blues he played Henry Goldblume during the entire seven-year run of the series, first as a detective sergeant, later as a lieutenant. Goldblume was one of Hill Street Precinct Captain Frank Furillo's trusted junior officers, serving at times as a hostage negotiator and gangs relations officer. The character was sympathetic to crime victims, sometimes coming in conflict with his duties as a police officer. Spano was one of many actors appearing through each episode, which typically had several interwoven story lines.

After Hill Street Blues ended, Spano won recurring roles in television police shows Murder One (1995) and NYPD Blue (1993), again as a detective, and has appeared regularly in 27 television movies and 20 television shows like The X-Files (episodes Tempus Fugit and Max), Mercy Point and Amazing Grace. Spano won the Emmy award in 1988 for Best Guest Actor in a Drama Series for a role he played in an episode of Midnight Caller. He has appeared in 27 feature films, including working alongside Tom Hanks in Apollo 13 and Richard Gere and Edward Norton in Primal Fear. His credits are often confused with Australian actor Joseph Spano. They are not related.

He is a veteran stage actor on the east and west coasts. Spano made his Broadway debut in 1992 in the Roundabout Theater revival of Arthur Miller's The Price, with Eli Wallach, which was nominated for a Tony for Best Revival. West coast stage credits include Eduardo Pavlovsky's Potestad, and David Mamet's Speed-the-Plow and American Buffalo, for which he was awarded an LA Drama Critics Circle Award. At the Rubicon Theater in Ventura he has played General Burgoyne in Shaw's The Devil's Disciple, Greg in A. R. Gurney's Sylvia and Vladimir in Waiting for Godot. He is a member of the Antaeus Theater Company and a founding member of three other theater companies. He played a seductive vampire in the cult musical Dracula: A Musical Nightmare in a small LA theatre. He also appeared in the TV movie Brotherhood of Justice with Keanu Reeves and Kiefer Sutherland.

Spano has been a recurring character in NCIS since its premiere episode, "Yankee White", playing FBI Special Agent Tobias Fornell, the FBI counterpart to NCIS Special Agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs, portrayed by Mark Harmon. The on-screen rapport between the two actors has made Spano much more visible to viewers than his number of actual screen appearances would suggest. Spano is best known for straight dramatic roles but, in NCIS, has adapted to the comedic/drama style of the show. Spano's character, Fornell, holds rank in the FBI equivalent to that held by the NCIS main character, Gibbs. Thus Spano is given key lines and comic moments as a foil for Gibbs and, in some episodes, equal screentime with the main lead.
Julie McCullough
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is an American model, actress and stand-up comedian. She was Playboy magazine's Playmate of the Month for February 1986, and played the role "Julie Costello" on Growing Pains in 1989-90.

McCullough worked as a model in her teens before moving to California. In 1984, McCullough graduated from high school and was living in Allen, Texas, when a photographer approached her to pose for Playboy magazine. She became a Playboy model appearing in four issues: February 1985 (on the cover and as part of a "Girls of Texas" pictorial), February 1986 (as Playmate of the Month), September 1986 (on the cover and as part of a "Farmer's Daughters" pictorial) and October 1989 (a post-Growing Pains compilation of her first three shoots with extra pictures).

In 1989, officials of North Carolina's Azalea Festival stripped Julie McCullough of her crown as Azalea Queen of Wilmington, because of controversy surrounding her appearance as a Playboy centerfold.

McCullough found work in a number of television and film projects. Her work included Max Headroom, The Golden Girls, a role in the 1987 film Big Bad Mama II co-starring Angie Dickinson, Superboy and the 1988 horror movie remake The Blob. She starred in the syndicated adventure series Robin's Hoods as Stacey Wright with singer-actor Rick Springfield. Robin's Hoods lasted one season on television.

Growing Pains

Julie McCullough landed the role of nanny Julie Costello on the television show Growing Pains in 1989. She appeared in eight episodes until she was fired in 1990, which allegedly stemmed from series star Kirk Cameron's conversion to evangelical Christianity, a conversion that, according to The E! True Hollywood Story episode focusing on the show, served to alienate him from his fellow cast members, as he did not invite any of them to his wedding. Though Cameron reports that he did not call for her to be fired in his 2008 autobiography Still Growing, and the show's producers have claimed that Julie's character was never intended to be a permanent character, the long-told story is that Cameron called for McCullough's termination because of his objections to her having posed nude in Playboy, accusing the show's producers of promoting pornography. A decade later, Cameron apologized to his TV family for some of his prior behavior due to his lack of maturity. He reportedly did not reconcile with McCullough, however, who claims that Cameron refused to speak to her during a later encounter, and who remains critical of him, stating that she lost a lot from the public criticism she endured from the controversy. Although McCullough herself is Catholic, she has criticized the evangelical television programming Cameron has produced, which she has viewed on one occasion, saying on her MySpace page:

He thinks if I read science books that I'm going to hell. [I would] rather laugh with the sinners than cry with the saints ... the sinners are much more fun. And a lot more interesting than some book-burner who is still having growing pains. I am at peace with God. Kirk thinks people like me are going to Hell, if I do then at least I'll go well informed and well read.

After the Growing Pains scandal, McCullough made several television appearances on Beverly Hills, 90210, Jake and the Fatman, Harry and the Hendersons and Drexell's Class.

McCullough now works as a stand-up comedian, and has performed at the Hollywood Improv, the Palms Hotel and Casino, and the Laugh Factory.

McCullough has appeared on the E! reality show The Girls Next Door. She appeared in "Under the Covers", the ninth episode of the first season, which aired in October 2005, and "May the Horse Be With You", the second episode of the third season, which aired in March 2007.
Kay Lenz
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is an American actress. A former child performer, Lenz has worked primarily in television and has won two Emmy Awards.

Lenz began working as a child actress, appearing in such television shows as The Andy Griffith Show (under the stage name Kay Ann Kemper), Opie's Group (1967) as well as in stage productions. She made a brief appearance in the film American Graffiti (1973) as one of the girls at the dance. She achieved recognition for her title-role performance as the free spirit who captivates William Holden in Breezy, directed by Clint Eastwood. She made guest appearances in The Streets of San Francisco, Gunsmoke, MacGyver, McCloud, Cannon, and Petrocelli, and played a lead role in the film White Line Fever (1975) before being cast in the miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man in 1976, for which she was nominated for an Emmy Award. She reprised her role for the sequel, Rich Man, Poor Man Book II (1976). Since the 1980s, she has played guest roles in numerous television series. In 1984 she appeared in Rod Stewart's music video for the song "Infatuation". She won an Emmy in 1989 for Midnight Caller.
Konrad Sheehan
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Konrad literally fell into the motion-picture industry in 1978, as a stuntman by performing a stair-fall for Rose Gregorio in "Eye's of Laura Mars" starring Faye Dunaway.

When Konrad met Walter Hill for the part as a gang member in the "Punks" for "The Warriors," Walter asked him if he could skate. Of course, he said "YES!!!;" even though he couldn't. Nevertheless, Konrad acquired a pair of skates, and spent the whole summer of '78 in Central Park at the band shell near 72nd street practicing. During that time, skating on the streets was not popular. One night while doing a non-stop 25 mile skate from Mt. Vernon, N.Y. to White Plains, N.Y. and back, a cop car pulled along side of him and asked him to pull over, and he said: "I can't." At that time, he had the mind-set that once he began skating, he didn't want to stop. The cop asked him three times to pull over. After the third time, Konrad told him "I can't; because, I'm skating for a record." The cop drove away and let him go. However, if the cop asked him what the record was, Konrad would have told him that... "I'm skating to my friends house for a Led Zeppelin album." This is a true story. About a week later, after his scenes in "The Warriors" wrapped, Konrad remembers working in Coney Island (about a mile away from "The Warriors" set) doing stunts for Lee Strasberg in "Boardwalk." He was asked by Marcelino Sanchez (Rembrandt) to stop by the set; but, he chose not to; because, he didn't want Walter to see him dressed as an 80 year old man.
Leif Garrett
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an American singer, actor and television personality. He became famous in the late 1970s as a child pop star and teen idol.

Career

In the first few years of his career Garrett performed under the name of "Leif Per"; however, casting agents found the name difficult to pronounce (Per is pronounced the same as "pair" or "pear"). In 1971, Garrett received a check in the mail incorrectly addressed to a "Leif Garrett". After Garrett and his mother undertook research on the name, they found that the name "Garrett" held connotations of strength, so the name stuck.

Acting career

Garrett and his sister Dawn Lyn worked a variety of small acting jobs. They co-starred in the horror movie Devil Times Five as juvenile mental patients who almost innocently go on a murder spree at an isolated ski resort. Dawn and Leif also guest-starred in an episode of Gunsmoke as well as Wonder Woman.

Garrett's more notable performances include the breakthrough role of Jimmy Henderson in Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969); the protagonist's son Mike Pusser from the Walking Tall movies (1973, 1975, 1977) and the recurring role of Zack Russell on the ABC TV series Family. Leif also played the role of Leonard Unger, the son of Felix Unger (Tony Randall), on the ABC series The Odd Couple, a part that previously was played by Willie Aames.

In the fall of 1975, Garrett, at fourteen, appeared in the role of Endy Karras in a 12-week CBS drama series Three for the Road, with Alex Rocco as his father, Peter Karras, and Vincent Van Patten as his older brother, John Karras. The story line is that of a father and two sons, grief-stricken over the death of their wife and mother sell their house, buy a recreational vehicle, and roam throughout the United States. Garrett's appearance in the program triggered a response from teenage girls and led to his first appearances in teenage magazines, such as Tiger Beat. Garrett also played alongside Lee Van Cleef in two Spaghetti Westerns shot in Israel: God's Gun and Kid Vengeance (it). Garrett also starred in the film Skateboard.

In the 1980s, Garrett returned to acting, appearing in a small role as Bob Sheldon in the 1983 Francis Ford Coppola film The Outsiders. In 1985 he starred in Shaker Run as a mechanic and in Thunder Alley as the lead singer of a pop band that is torn apart by drugs. Other notable Leif Garrett movies from the decade include Delta Fever and the horror film Cheerleader Camp.

Music career

In autumn of 1976, Garrett signed a recording contract with Atlantic Records and recorded his first album, Leif Garrett. The album was released in 1977, and his first four singles charted modestly on the US Billboard Hot 100. All of these hits were covers of late 1950s and early 1960s hits such as "Runaround Sue" and "The Wanderer." In mid-1978 he signed with Scotti Brothers Records and recorded his second album, Feel the Need. Its first single, "I Was Made For Dancin'", reached #10 on the US Hot 100 and #4 on the British chart in early-1979. It became his greatest hit in both the US and the UK. However, subsequent singles failed to crack the Top 20 in either country. Nevertheless, Garrett continued to record, releasing the albums Same Goes For You (1979), Can't Explain (1980) and My Movie of You (1981) in quick succession.

1990 - 2005
In the mid-1990s, Garrett returned to acting and singing, appearing in the 1995 low-budget horror film Dominion, touring with The Melvins and recording vocals for their cover of "Smells Like Teen Spirit" on The Crybaby (2000). In 1998, a greatest hits compilation, The Leif Garrett Collection, was released. Garrett, however, has stated: "My former record label was bought out. The label was started by me meaning my music started it, funded it. And then it was bought out by some company that released the Greatest Hits Collection. Not only have I not seen any royalties from that, but they wanted me to promote it, the compensation being a couple of CDs."

In 1999 he formed the band Godspeed with Christopher Wade Damerst and Michael Scott (The Distortions, Deadtime Stories). They recorded a three-song EP on Garrett's own label, Tongue and Groove Records, and debuted on The Rosie O'Donnell Show, but broke up after only a few performances.

Garrett's stage work includes playing the title role in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat and, in late 2000, appearing in the National Theatre of the Deaf's production of A Child's Christmas In Wales. He also appeared in summer stock at The Barn Theatre's production of Old Timer in 2001. In the same year, he voiced himself in the animated television series Family Guy episode "The Thin White Line".

In 2003, Garrett appeared as himself in the David Spade film Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star. He also co-wrote and sang "Former Child Star" for the film's soundtrack and was one of the singers of "Child Stars on Your Television", which played over the ending credits.

2006 - present

In September 2006, Garrett appeared on the celebrity edition of Fear Factor. He won the grand prize of $50,000. On New Year's Eve 2006, Garrett first appeared in Las Vegas with retro act Original Idols LIVE!, hosted by Barry Williams. The show also featured the Bay City Rollers, Bo Donaldson and The Heywoods and The Cowsills, with selected appearances by Merrill Osmond, Tony DeFranco and Danny Bonaduce.

In August 2007, Country Music Television (CMT) cast Garrett in the short-lived Ty Murray's Celebrity Bull Riding Challenge, among nine celebrities appearing on the show. However, he quit after one episode, citing soreness and lack of desire to continue.

In November 2007, Garrett released the album Three Sides of..., which constituted songs he recorded with his current band F8 and his 1990s band Godspeed as well as some new songs.

Garrett toured South Korea in May 2010, with shows in Seoul and Busan. This marked the 30th anniversary of Garrett's first performance in Korea in June 1980. He embarked on another tour of the country in 2013.

In the early 2010s, Garrett began collaborating with punk rock artist and songwriter Craig Else. . The two have also recorded a cover of Neil Young's "Old Man".

Beginning in 1979, Garrett dated English actress Nicollette Sheridan; the two split six years later Two decades later, Garrett credited Sheridan for helping him at the start of his career, and said of her "She's a special person in my life

Mackenzie Phillips
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an American actress and singer best known for her roles in American Graffiti and as rebellious teenager Julie Cooper Horvath on the sitcom One Day at a Time.

She is more recently known for her role in the Disney Channel science fiction show So Weird.

Phillips was 12 when the filming of American Graffiti began, and 14 when the movie was released. She was cast as Carol Morrison, a young girl accidentally picked up by hot rodding teenager John Milner. Because of California state law, producer Gary Kurtz became Phillips' legal guardian during the filming.

Phillips gained stardom in the 1970s, when she played boy-crazy teenager Julie Cooper Horvath on the long-running television show One Day at a Time, for which she earned $50,000 a week. During the show's third season in 1977.

From the mid-1980s to the early 1990s, Phillips performed with a re-formed version of The Mamas & the Papas known as The New Mamas and The Papas.

In 1999, Phillips co-starred with Cara DeLizia in the Disney Channel series So Weird, playing a fictional rock star coincidentally named Molly Phillips. She was mother to Fiona, played by Cara DeLizia, and Jack played by Patrick Levis. In the third season, Fiona was replaced by Alexz Johnson, and Molly became a sort of mother to her. She sang original songs written by show producers Jon Cooksey and Ann Marie Montade. In 2002, she appeared in the Disney Channel original movie Double Teamed. Phillips has since guest-starred on episodes of ER, Without a Trace, 7th Heaven, and Cold Case.
Marc Copage
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Marc Copage was born on June 21, 1962 in Los Angeles, California, He is an actor, known for Julia (1968), The Kid (2000) and The Wave (1981).

In 1968, the sitcom Julia became the first TV series with a Black woman in the leading role. The barrier-breaking show, which aired for three seasons, starred Diahann Carroll as a widowed nurse and newcomer Marc Copage as her young son.

Michael Beck
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an American actor, perhaps best known for his role as Swan in the 1979 film, The Warriors.

Beck is known predominantly for his roles as "Swan" in the action film The Warriors (1979), "Sonny Malone" in Xanadu (1980), "Lieutenant-Commander Dallas" in Megaforce (1982), and as "Koda" in Triumphs of a Man Called Horse (1982). Beck also appeared in other movies such as Warlords of the 21st Century, The Last Ninja, The Golden Seal (as an evil poacher), "Alcatraz: The Whole Shocking Story" (as Clarence Carnes), "Rearview Mirror", the 1984 TV movie "Blackout", and Wes Craven's Chiller (as a cryonically suspended sociopath). He read for, but did not get, the role of Sir Lancelot in John Boorman's movie Excalibur. Michael starred in a short-lived television series, Houston Knights (1987), in the role of "Sgt. Levon Lundy." More recently, Beck starred in television shows JAG, Robin's Hoods, Walker Texas Ranger (in the episodes Flashpoint and A Difficult Peace), "In the Heat of the Night (TV Series), and as the Mars-born terrorist-turned-cyborg assassin "Abel Horn" in the science fiction TV series Babylon 5 1994 episode "Spider in the Web", and as "Mr. Jones" in the spinoff series Crusade (episode The Well of Forever).

Michael has narrated numerous audiobooks of John Grisham's novels.
Michael Link
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Michael Link was born on June 12, 1962 in Provo, Utah, USA. He is an actor, known for Julia (1968), Stowaway to the Moon (1975) and ABC Afterschool Specials (1972).

1977 - Police Story (TV Series) - Jed Caulder
1975 - Three for the Road (TV Series)
1973-1975 - ABC Afterschool Specials (TV Series) - Alvin / Joey
1975 - Stowaway to the Moon (TV Movie) - Eli 'E.J.' Mackernutt Jr.
1972 - The Courtship of Eddie's Father (TV Series) - Bruce
1971 - The Bob Hope Show (TV Series)
1968-1971 - Julia (TV Series) - Earl J. Waggendorn
1967 - The Felony Squad (TV Series) - Jackie Lasher
1968 - The Hollywood Palace (TV Series) - Himself/Singer
Michael Warren
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an American TV actor and former college basketball player, best known for playing Officer Bobby Hill on the NBC television series Hill Street Blues.

Warren would go on to work as an actor in television. In addition to his starring role on Hill Street Blues he had an earlier role on The White Shadow, a co-starring role on the CBS series City of Angels, a recurring role on the Showtime series Soul Food, and as a guest star as Jason on Marcus Welby, M.D

Before Hill Street Blues, in 1974 he played the role of park ranger P. J. Lewis on the NBC adventure series Sierra, and in 1979, he starred as police officer Willie Miller on the CBS crime drama Paris, the first effort by Hill Street Blues executive producer Steven Bochco. He guest starred in "In the House" opposite LL Cool J as Debbie Allen's ex-husband. He also guest starred on the Fox sitcom Living Single as Khadijah's father, and later portrayed Joan's father on the UPN/CW sitcom Girlfriends. Warren played Darrin Dewitt Henson's boss on the Showtime show, Soul Food, in which he played hustler-turned-entrepreneur, Baron Marks. He had a recurring role on the ABC Family series, Lincoln Heights, as Spencer Sutton, Eddie's father.

Warren appeared as Virgil Tibbs' former longtime police partner, Matthew Pogue on the episode of In the Heat of the Night "The Hammer and the Glove" in 1988. In 1996, he was on the Early Edition episode Hoops. In 2002, he appeared in "Normal Again", an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, as a psychiatrist trying to convince Buffy Summers she is delusional.

His film work includes 1976's Norman... Is That You? with Redd Foxx and Pearl Bailey and as basketball player Easley in the 1971 film Drive, He Said directed by Jack Nicholson.

Molly Hagan
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Molly Hagan was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the daughter of Mary Elizabeth (nee Henslee) and John Robert Hagan. She was raised in Fort Wayne, Indiana and attended Northwestern University. Hagan played 'Diana Luna' alongside Chuck Norris on the 1985 cult action film "Code of Silence".

She has made appearances in films such as "Some Kind of Wonderful" and most notably as the young 'Miss Ellie Ewing' in the television movie "Dallas: The Early Years"(a prequel of the long-running soap opera "Dallas") and she has appeared in several other television series, including the 1980s situation comedy "The Golden Girls".

She starred in the cult series "Herman's Head" which ran on Fox from 1991 to 1994. She portrayed 'Angel', one of the four characters inside 'Herman', and represented his sensitivity. She was in two episodes of the detective mystery series 'Columbo', namely "Murder, Smoke and Shadows" (1989), and "Butterfly in Shades of Grey" (1994).

Molly also appeared twice on "Murder, She Wrote" (in two different roles). In the end of the second season of "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine", she played a young 'Vorta' called 'Eris' in "The Jem'Hadar". She appeared in three episodes of the third season of "Becker", she also appeared on "Seinfeld" as 'Sister Roberta', the Latvian Orthodox novice that Kramer nearly took from the church, and a cooking teacher on "Friends".

She played a trailer trash mother in a Jerry Springer-based movie, "Ringmaster" oppisite Jamie Presley. She played 'Ms. McAllister' in the 1999 movie "Election" opposite Matthew Broderick and also played 'Coach Crenshaw' in "Air Bud: Seventh Inning Fetch".

Molly played Emma Roberts's mother in the Nickelodeon series "Unfabulous" from 2004 to 2007. She also made a guest appearances in many television series, such as "Charmed", "Bones", "Grey's Anatomy", "Desperate Housewives", "Ghost Whisperer", "Cold Case", "Private Practice", "The Closer", and "NYPD Blue". Hagan also appeared in Disney Channel Original Movie "Princess Protection Program" in 2009, and had another guest appearance in an episode of the Disney Channel sitcom "Liv and Maddie".

In 2014, Molly was cast as the lead character's mother in The CW series, "IZombie", based on the DC Comics.

She co-starred in Clint Eastwood's "Sully", and guested in "Big Little Lies", "Jane The Virgin", "True Detective", "Castle", and numerous roles.

Upcoming parts include: "Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders", "The Orville", & the "Dark Web".
Robert Clohessy

1st Ever Appearance!
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Robert Clohessy (born June 10, 1957) is an American actor. He is best known for playing Correctional Officer Sean Murphyon the HBO prison drama Oz from seasons 3-6.

Also Warden Boss James Neary on the HBO crime drama Boardwalk Empire for the first two seasons and Lieutenant Sid Gormley on police drama Blue Bloods. Clohessy has had recurring roles in daytime dramas All My Children Boy Meets World, and Guiding Light. In primetime, he has become known for his multiple regular turns as police officers and other law enforcement officials, creating parallels between his acting career and upbringing by his policeman father. The first of such roles was in the seventh and final season of Hill Street Blues, as Officer Patrick Flaherty. The following season, Clohessy was cast as the new co-star of Pat Morita on the ABC detective series Ohara, playing Lt. George Shaver.

He later joined the cast of the HBO prison drama Oz as Correctional Officer Sean Murphy. However, in between these roles, Clohessy had a supporting role as Thomas Smaraldo on NBC's comedy/drama Tattingers (1988-89), and soon after appeared in a starring role on NBC's short-lived comedy One of the Boys (1989). Clohessy co-starred on the Neal Marlens/Carol BlackABC sitcom Laurie Hill in 1992, playing a stay-at-home freelance writer. In 2008, Clohessy had a regular role in the short-lived Fox show New Amsterdam. He won a Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble in the HBO series Boardwalk Empire.

In feature films, Clohessy played a supporting role in Across the Universe, playing the part of Jude's long-lost father. He played Jack Parker in The Crimson Mask. His largest big budget film role was opposite Ryan Gosling in The Place Beyond the Pines. Onstage, he played Mike in the Broadway Roundabout Theatre Company revival of Pal Joey, from November, 2008 through February 2009. In 2012 he had a cameo in the film The Avengers.
Shirley Jones
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an American singer and actress of stage, film and television. In her six decades of show business, she has starred as wholesome characters in a number of well-known musical films, such as Oklahoma! (1955), Carousel (1956), and The Music Man (1962).

She won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for playing a vengeful prostitute in Elmer Gantry (1960). She played Shirley Partridge, the widowed mother of five children in the situation-comedy television series The Partridge Family (1970-€“74), which co-starred her real-life stepson David Cassidy, son of Jack Cassidy.

Jones impressed Rodgers and Hammerstein with her musically trained voice and she was cast as the female lead in the film adaptation of their hit musical Oklahoma! in 1955. Other film musicals quickly followed, including Carousel, April Love (1957) and The Music Man, in which she was often typecast as a wholesome, kind character. However, she won a 1960 Academy Award for her performance in Elmer Gantry portraying a woman corrupted by the title character played by Burt Lancaster. Her character becomes a prostitute who encounters her seducer years later and takes her revenge. The director, Richard Brooks, had originally fought against her being in the movie, but after seeing her first scene told her she would win an Oscar for her performance. She was reunited with Ron Howard (who had played her brother in The Music Man) in The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963). Jones landed the role of a lady who fell in love with the professor in Fluffy (1965). She also has an impressive stage, including playing the title character in the Broadway musical Maggie Flynn in 1968.

In 1970, after her film roles dwindled, and after turning down the role of Carol Brady on The Brady Bunch, a role that ultimately went to her best friend, Florence Henderson, Jones was more than happy to be the producers' first choice to audition for the lead role of Shirley Partridge in The Partridge Family, an ABC sitcom based loosely on the real-life musical family The Cowsills. The series focused on a young widowed mother whose five children form a pop rock group after the entire family painted its signature bus to travel. She was convinced that the combination of music and comedy would be a surefire hit. Jones realized, however, that:

The problem with Partridge though it was great for me and gave me an opportunity to stay home and raise my kids when my agents came to me and presented it to me, they said if you do a series and it becomes a hit show, you will be that character for the rest of your life and your film career will go into the toilet, which is what happened. But I have no regrets

During its first season, it became a hit and was screened in over 70 countries. Within months, Jones and her co-stars were pop culture television icons. Her real-life twenty-year-old stepson David Cassidy, who was an unknown actor at the time, played Shirley Partridge's eldest son, Keith, and became the hottest teen idol in the country. The show itself also spawned a number of records and songs performed by David and Shirley. That same year, "I Think I Love You" reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 music chart, making Jones the second person, after Frank Sinatra, and the first woman to win an acting Oscar and also have a No. 1 hit on that chart.

By 1974, the ratings had declined and the series was dropped from the prime-time lineup after four seasons and 96 episodes. Though Jones was outraged about the series' cancellation,[citation needed] she held the show together. It was one of six series to be canceled that year (along with Room 222, The F.B.I., The Brady Bunch, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, and Here's Lucy) to make room for new shows.

Shirley Jones' friendship with David Cassidy's family began in the mid-to-late 1950s, when David was just six, after he learned about his father's divorce from his mother Evelyn Ward. Upon David's first meeting with Shirley before co-starring with her on The Partridge Family, he said, "The day he tells me that they're divorced, he tells me, 'We're remarried, and let me introduce you to my new wife.' He was thrilled when her first film, Oklahoma! (1955), had come out; and my dad took me to see it just see her, and I go, uh-oh, it doesn't really quite register with me, 'cause I'm in total shock, because I wanted to hate her, but the instant that I met her, I got the essence of her. She's a very warm open, sweet, good human being. She couldn't have thawed it for me – the coldness and the ice—any more than she did." Shirley was shocked to hear her real-life stepson was going to audition for the role of Keith Partridge. David said, "At the auditions, they introduced me to the lead actress (Shirley Jones) 'cause they had no idea, they had no idea. So I said, 'What are you doing here?' She looked at me and said, 'What are you doing here?' And I said, 'Well, I'm reading for the lead guy.' I said, 'What are you doing here?' She said, 'I'm the mother!'" Cassidy discussed his relationship with his stepmother on the show: "She wasn't my mother, and I can be very open, and we can speak, and we became very close friends. She was a very good role model for me, watching the way, you know, she dealt with people on the set, and watching people revere her." After the show's cancellation, Cassidy remained very close to his half-brothers and the rest of his cast mates, especially Shirley.

Cassidy appeared on many shows alongside his stepmother, including A&E Biography, TV Land Confidential, and The Today Show, and he was one of the presenters of his stepmother's Intimate Portrait on Lifetime Television, and the reality show pilot In Search of the Partridge Family, where he served as co-executive producer. The rest of the cast also celebrated the 25th, 30th, and the 35th anniversaries of The Partridge Family (although Cassidy was unavailable to attend the 25th anniversary in 1995 owing to other commitments). In addition, Jack Cassidy's death in 1976 drew Jones and Cassidy closer as Shirley's three children and stepson mourned their father.
Tahnee Welch

Saturday Only!
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Tahnee Welch is an American actress and the daughter of actress Raquel Welch.

Her film career began in Italy starring opposite Virna Lisi. Returning to the U.S., she starred in Ron Howard's 'Cocoon' and its sequel 'Cocoon: The Return', in which she portrayed a beautiful alien. Returning to Europe, she continued working mostly in Italian and German film and televison productions. She has also appearaed in American independent pictures 'I Shot Andy Warhol', 'Sue', and 'Search and Destroy'. She also played the role of Catherine Powell in the 1966 video game 'Ripper'. In 1995, Welch graced the cover and pages of the November '95 issue of Playboy magazine. Welch also appeared in American Vogue, Italian Vogue, British GQ, Interview, French Marie Claire, Italian Moda and German Bunte magazines.
Tony Dow

Saturday Only!
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Bio coming soon.

Tony Perez
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a film and television actor. Perez was born in Portsmouth, Virginia. He is best known for portraying Officer Mike Perez on Hill Street Blues from 1981 to 1985.

He also appeared in Lou Grant, CHiPs, The Golden Girls, L.A. Law, General Hospital, The Larry Sanders Show, NYPD Blue(S04E16), Six Feet Under, Sons of Anarchy, 24, and Once Upon a Time

Scarface (1983)
Blow (2001)
Right At Your Door (2006)
Close Range (2015)
Troy Byer
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Troy Byer an American film director, screenwriter and actress.

Byer began her acting career with a role on the children's program Sesame Street when she was just four years old. After landing a bit part in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984), Beyer moved to Los Angeles, where she became a regular on the ABC prime-time soap opera Dynasty in 1986, playing Jackie Deveraux, the daughter of Diahann Carroll's character Dominique Deveraux. She went on to earn ShoWest's Newcomer of the Year Award for her leading role in the feature Rooftops (1989).

Since then, Beyer has acted in features such as Disorderlies (1987), Weekend at Bernie's II (1993), Eddie (1996) starring Whoopi Goldberg, Robert Altman's The Gingerbread Man (1998) starring Kenneth Branagh and Robert Downey Jr., and John Q, (2002) starring Denzel Washington.

But it was in 1997 that she put her writing skills to use, making her screenwriting debut with B*A*P*S, starring Halle Berry. Unhappy with how her script had been changed during the course of filming, the following year she decided to direct her next screenplay, Let's Talk About Sex (1998), also playing a starring role. Beyer made a trailer and took it to the Sundance Film Festival, where she handed it out to film executives. The film was quickly picked up by Fine Line Features. She next wrote and directed Love Don't Co$t a Thing (2003) for Warner Brothers, based on the hit 1987 movie Can't Buy Me Love.

Byer appeared in music videos for Prince's songs "Sexy MF" and Biz Markie's 1991 minor hit single "What Comes Around Goes Around".