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Jan Michael Vincent
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a retired American actor best known for his role as helicopter pilot Stringfellow Hawke on the 1980s U.S. television series Airwolf (1984-86) and as the protagonist of John Milius's 1978 surfing epic Big Wednesday.

Vincent was finishing a stint in the California Army National Guard when a talent scout was struck by his looks. His first acting job was in the movie The Bandits (aka Los Banditos), co-directed by and starring Robert Conrad, in 1967.

Vincents career took off in the late 1960s when casting agent Dick Clayton signed him to Universal Studios. He made a shirtless appearance on the Dragnet 1968 episode "The Grenade" as a muscular high school student who suffered an acid attack by a mentally unstable classmate (played by Mickey Sholdar). He also appeared in the Danger Island segments of Hanna-Barbera's The Banana Splits series as Link (1968-69). Finally, in the fall of 1969 Vincent had a starring role in the prime-time soap opera The Survivors, alongside Lana Turner and George Hamilton; however, the series was canceled at mid-season.

Vincent also performed in several movies in that period, such as the 1969 Twentieth Century Fox movie The Undefeated (as Bubba Wilkes) starring John Wayne, Rock Hudson, and Mexican actor Antonio Aguilar. His name appeared as Michael Vincent in the credits of the movie. Vincent guest-starred in two episodes of Bonanza (April 1969's The Unwanted as Rick Miller and The Arrival of Eddie as Eddie MacKay May 19, 1968, Season 9 credited as Michael Vincent).

1970s
Vincent appeared in one episode of Marcus Welby, M.D. as Richie, a teen with an alcohol addiction. He co-starred with Charles Bronson in the 1972 crime film The Mechanic. In 1970, he garnered critical praise for his role in the made-for-TV film Tribes also known as The Soldier Who Declared Peace in Europe and the UK, co-starring Darren McGavin, about a tough Marine boot-camp drill instructor dealing with a hippie draftee (Vincent), who will not play by the rules. Other notable films included the cult surfing film Big Wednesday with William Katt and Gary Busey; he also attracted attention giving a highly complex performance opposite Robert Mitchum in Going Home. In 1971 he appeared in the Gunsmoke episode The Legend.

In 1972 Vincent starred in a made-for-TV love story, Sandcastles, and in 1973 he starred in the Disney movie The World's Greatest Athlete, with Tim Conway and John Amos. He also starred in the 1974 romance Buster and Billie as the romantic antihero Buster Lane, where he startled audiences with his full-frontal nudity. In Hooper with Burt Reynolds, Vincent played a young stunt man. In 1975 Bite the Bullet found him sharing screen time opposite Gene Hackman, James Coburn, and Candice Bergen. He also starred in the cult classic trucker movie White Line Fever; in 1976's Baby Blue Marine, a war film directed by John D. Hancock, which also starred Glynnis 'Connor; and in the 1976 cult classic Shadow of the Hawk co-starring Marilyn Hassett. Vincent also appeared in Damnation Alley, based on Roger Zelazny's science fiction novel, in 1977.

In 1980, Vincent starred in the gang-themed drama Defiance, which received a limited release. In that film, he costarred alongside Danny Aiello as Manhattan residents who fight back against the gang members who terrorize their neighborhood. He also appeared in The Return, a science fiction film that was released directly to television and video. In 1981, he co-starred with Kim Basinger in Hard Country. Vincent starred in the 1983 action film Last Plane Out.

After the completion of his role in the 1983 television miniseries Winds of War, Vincent was cast as Stringfellow Hawke for the action espionage series Airwolf, in which he co-starred with Ernest Borgnine and is the role for which he is best known and remembered, as well as for his rate of pay. It was noted, at the time, that Vincent's salary for his work on Airwolf was the highest paid (rumored to be $200,000 per episode) of any actor in American television] While filming Airwolf, Vincent admitted to drug and alcohol problems for which he acknowledged seeking help.

After the end of Airwolf he found roles in smaller budget and lower exposure film projects.

1990s and 2000s
Vincent worked with Traci Lords in the 1991 suspense film Raw Nerve.

While in the hospital in 1996, Vincent was committed to a role in Red Line with Chad McQueen as Keller. He appeared in the film with a swollen face and scars, and still wearing the hospital ID bracelet.

In 1997, he had a small guest role on Nash Bridges, playing the title character's long-lost brother.

An exception to Vincent's post-Airwolf career was his cameo role in the critically acclaimed, independent film Buffalo '66, in 1998.

His most recent movie roles included the independent film White Boy, also titled Menace (for the U.S. video version), released in March 2002.
Jerry Mathers

1st Ever Chicago Appearance!
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This is an example of the endearing words said by Jerry "The Beaver" Mathers, who has become an American icon.

Born on June 2, 1948 in Sioux City Iowa, Jerry's television and show business career began at the tender age of two when he did a Pet Condensed Milk commercial with Ed Wynn on the "Colgate Comedy Hour." He continued to work on many of the early '50's live television shows and in 1954, he made his movie debut co-starring with Linda Darnell in "This Is My Love." He then caught the attention of Alfred Hitchcock who signed him for the 1955 film, "The Trouble with Harry," starring John Forsythe and Shirley MacLaine in what was her very first film role. The budding young actor next appeared in two Bob Hope movies, "The Seven Little Foys" and "That Certain Feeling." Two movies with Alan Ladd followed, "The Deep Six" and "Men of the Fighting Lady."

It was in 1957 however; with the debut of the series "Leave It To Beaver" that Jerry entered the hearts and homes of America. An immediate success, the show gained national attention and ran for six seasons, totaling 234 episodes. When it celebrated its 50th anniversary on October 4, 2007, the show became the longest running scripted show in television history. This year in 2017, the show is celebrating its 60th anniversary! Currently shown on Me-TV and in countries throughout the world, "Leave it to Beaver" has made Jerry an American Icon.

His television movie, "Still the Beaver", was one of the top ten movies of the week for 1982 which led to the development of a new series entitled "The New Leave It To Beaver." Jerry successfully completed filming 108 episodes which were syndicated and aired in all major domestic and foreign markets. As well as starring in the series, Jerry also directed multiple episodes. Mathers has a high "Q" rating for name and face recognition and is known by people throughout the world.
Sybil Danning
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known for her many roles in B movies, science fiction films, and action films.

Danning became an actress after leaving home about 1968 at the age of sixteen.

Danning made her film debut in 1968's Komm nur, mein liebstes gelein, portraying the legendary German mermaid "Lorelei" covered by only her long blonde tresses. The next year, she had a role in one of Robert De Niros first films, Sam's Song.

Danning next trained for three years with a drama coach in Munich. In 1972, she was in the cast of Bluebeard, along with Raquel Welch and Richard Burton, playing a high-caliber prostitute. The same year, she appeared in Eye of the Labyrinth, a giallo thriller.

Also noteworthy were her films The Three Musketeers and The Four Musketeers, again acting with Raquel Welch; both movies being produced by Ilya and Alexander Salkind.

In 1978, Danning moved to Hollywood, California, to further her career in American films. She left all her friends and family in Europe behind, and pursued her career with no contract, no agent, and no idea what the future would bring.

Danning portrayed an extraterrestrial Amazon named Saint-Exmin in the 1980 film Battle Beyond the Stars. This performance earned her "The Golden Scroll Award of Merit" from the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films.The cheaply-made films Jungle Warriors, Panther Squad, and S.A.S. San Salvador followed in quick succession.

In 1983, Danning appeared on the cover of the August issue of Playboy magazine and in a nude Playboy pictorial inside.

Next, Sybil co-starred with Christopher Lee in Howling II: Your Sister is a Werewolf, playing Stirba, an evil werewolf queen. She began to guest-star in many American television series, notably A Man Called Sloane, Vega$, Simon & Simon, Masquerade, The Fall Guy, and V (The TV series). In 1986, Sybil was seen with the troubled rocker Wendy O. Williams in Reform School Girls, a campy "Women in Prison" film. After the sketch parody Amazon Women on the Moon, Sybil founded her own production company, "Adventuress Productions, Inc.", and that one produced L.A. Bounty, in which she starred and helped write the script.

Danning was the hostess of her own collection of 26 action-adventure films that bear the title Sybil Danning's Adventure Video for the "USA Home Video" company. She appeared at the beginning, spouted one-liners, introduced the video, and returned at the end to wrap it up. In 1989, Danning re-teamed with the producers of Bluebeard, The Three Musketeers, The Four Musketeers, and The Prince and the Pauper to play a succubus in the television series Superboy.

In 1990, Danning's acting career was cut short by an accident in a gymnasium while she was rehearsing a film stunt. For the next two months, she rested, while working with writers on her first screenplay-writing experience, but the pain worsened. Doctors misdiagnosed her condition as either a strained muscle or a damaged nerve, and they prescribed painkillers and massages. Finally, a surgeon, recommended by Jack Nicholson, discovered that Danning had two severely herniated discs, and put her into the hospital that same afternoon.

Danning underwent a series of epidurals, followed by traction. At that point, Sybil could not walk, and she was always either in bed or in a wheelchair. At first, she was determined to overcome her orthopedic problem without surgery, but the pain became too overwhelming. Sybil finally consented to a new microdissectomy technique on the day after Thanksgiving 1990. She spent the following year recovering and watched the duration of the Persian Gulf War from her hospital bed.

In 2003, Danning returned to public performances. She started by appearing in the fan memorabilia convention circuit, with appearances in California, Chicago, Illinois, Georgia, Michigan, Ohio, and New Jersey. The Chiller Theater in New Jersey included footage of Danning in her first appearance in its 2004 documentary, UnConventional.

The year 2007 marked Danning's return to the big screen, most notably in the film Grindhouse, in a faux trailer titled Werewolf Women of the SS. This was followed by her appearance in Rob Zombie's remake of Halloween.
Tammy Locke
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is an American actor and performer, known for her work as a child actor in The Monroes and other films and TV series.

She acted in The Voice of Charlie Pont (ABC, 1962)as Sally Laurents, the daughter of characters played by Robert Redford and Diana Hyland. She went on to play a similar role in 1965 melodrama Once a Thief as the daughter of Ann-Margret and Alain Delon and niece of Jack Palance, and early the following year played Tootie Smith in the ABC television comedy pilot Meet me in St. Louis.

In the 26-episode ABC television series The Monroes, which screened in 1966 and 1967, Locke, aged six, played Amy Monroe, the youngest of a group of siblings who had to care for themselves in northwestern Wyoming in the Wild West.She was described by the Christian Science Monitor as "an especially endearing little dumpling" for her performance in the series, which was filmed at 20th Century Fox television in Century City, California. Locke was unpredictable and "tumultuous" on set, giving a live frog as a gift to the show's hairdresser.[9] Filming Once a Thief she had objected to a scene where she comforted her wounded, blood-soaked and dying father, on the grounds that, "I've got new clothes on and my mother will be very mad if they get dirty". On one occasion she responded to directorial criticism by pulling on the director's beard.

Locke's final film appearance as a child actor was in Hang 'Em High which starred Clint Eastwood. Her acting work also included television commercials and voiceover recordings.
Tony Dow

1st Ever Chicago Appearance!
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an American film producer, director, sculptor, and television actor.

Dow is best known for his role in the television sitcom Leave It to Beaver, which ran in primetime from 1957 to 1963. Dow played Wally Cleaver, the elder son of June (played by Barbara Billingsley) and Ward Cleaver (played by Hugh Beaumont) and the brother of Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver (played by Jerry Mathers).

Dow was a Junior Olympics diving champion He won the role of Wally Cleaver in a casting call with almost no previous acting experience

Dow acted in the series until it ended in 1963. After that, he appeared in the television series My Three Sons, Dr. Kildare, Mr. Novak (five episodes in three different roles), The Greatest Show on Earth, and Never Too Young. From 1965 to 1968, he served in the National Guard, interrupting his acting career. On his return to acting, he was a guest star in the television series Adam-12, Love American Style, Knight Rider, Square Pegs, The Mod Squad, The Hardy Boys, and Emergency!.

During the 1970s, Dow continued acting while working in the construction industry and studying journalism and filmmaking.

In 1987, he was honored by the Young Artist Foundation with its Former Child Star Lifetime Achievement Award for his role as Wally Cleaver.

Dow's most recent screen appearance was in the 2003 film Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star
Trina Parks
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an American actress, vocalist, choreographer, principal dancer and dance instructor.

She is most famous for portraying Thumper in 1971's Diamonds Are Forever.
Tristan Rogers
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Bio Coming Soon.